Meet Komang & Ketut

Ketut (left), Komang (right), and Cynthia c. 1988

Komang (left), Ketut (right) c. 2020


Komang means third born, Ketut means fourth born. They are the (life) partners who craft the Elppin you (will) wear. Together, they work on their own time, in their home workshop in Bali.

Carina first met Ketut and Komang when she was two weeks old, but their relationship precedes birth. In 1983, Carina’s mother Cynthia met Ketut and Komang in a silver village in Bali. They became dear friends, and collaborated for many years making shell and silver earrings among many other beautiful creations.

Ketut has a beaming smile, an enthusiasm for creativity, and a commitment to the generational wisdom of artisans. Like most Balinese women, Komang does it all; she keeps the shop organized, and her husband on track, and prides herself on her attention to detail, in addition to making daily offerings to honor the Gods and caring for the family compound where their two sons and families also live.

Carina is blessed to have known Ketut and Komang all her life. The three often spend free time together, laughing and creating in their home workshop, where Carina is a regular both at family meals, and Ketut and Komang’s frequent family and village temple ceremonies.

Komang and Ketut are proudly part of the Balinese tradition of heritage metalsmiths, who trace their roots back to the Majapahit empire in the 15th century. Nature is revered, and beauty in all forms is considered a gift, both from and to the Gods. Beauty created by human hands in an incarnation of God and precious metals are especially respected and honored, as they are God’s gift from the “heart of the earth”.

Meet Komang & Ketut

 

Ketut (left), Komang (right), and Cynthia c. 1988

Komang (left), Ketut (right) c. 2020


Komang means third born, Ketut means fourth born. They are the (life) partners who craft the Elppin you (will) wear. Together, they work on their own time, in their home workshop in Bali.

Carina first met Ketut and Komang when she was two weeks old, but their relationship precedes birth. In 1983, Carina’s mother Cynthia met Ketut and Komang in a silver village in Bali. They became dear friends, and collaborated for many years making shell and silver earrings among many other beautiful creations.

Ketut has a beaming smile, an enthusiasm for creativity, and a commitment to the generational wisdom of artisans. Like most Balinese women, Komang does it all; she keeps the shop organized, and her husband on track, and prides herself on her attention to detail, in addition to making daily offerings to honor the Gods and caring for the family compound where their two sons and families also live.

Carina is blessed to have known Ketut and Komang all her life. The three often spend free time together, laughing and creating in their home workshop, where Carina is a regular both at family meals, and Ketut and Komang’s frequent family and village temple ceremonies.

Komang and Ketut are proudly part of the Balinese tradition of heritage metalsmiths, who trace their roots back to the Majapahit empire in the 15th century. Nature is revered, and beauty in all forms is considered a gift, both from and to the Gods. Beauty created by human hands in an incarnation of God and precious metals are especially respected and honored, as they are God’s gift from the “heart of the earth”.